Support our #filmmakers: My Weekend on Set of Sharrie Mccain’s “Collision Envisage”: What I have Learned

This past weekend (March 11 and 12, 2017) marked the conclusion of the phase of filmmaking known as Principal Photography, for “Collision Envisage”. Principal photography is when cameras roll to record the actors and make the movie or TV show or web series, etc. The preceding phase, called pre-production, should encompass all the planning leading to a smooth principal photography. The desired effect is that during the post-production phase, no reshoots will be necessary.

During pre-production, I was involved by reviewing and commenting on the script.

I was on set for every shooting day during principal photography of “Collision Envisage”. Multiple posts on my blog have documented the journey.

Now the post-production phase will commence.

I have learned so much during this phase, both from being on set and researching applicable topics. Just documenting this on my blog has helped me learn. I have made so many valuable new connections.

  • A great team – This is essential in front of and behind the camera. All associated with this project worked so well together. Serious work being done, but it was so much fun, too.
  • Change is constant – The script has evolved over the course of the process due to various factors: providing better story flow; recasting due to unavailability of a resource; location changing due to availability or weather. Script changes can even occur during rehearsals.
  • Time-consuming – Even the simplest of scenes can take a long time to film. Rehearsals, blocking, camera positioning, and lighting are just some of the things that must be done prior to the actual shoot.
  • Feeding the crew – I think pizza is the official food of a small Indie production.
  • Slating – As this was my primary task on set, I learned the purpose of the slate (to synchronize audio and picture); syntax of the slate, reflecting the scene, camera position, and take; as well as location and time of day information.
  • Set dressing – Converting a space (indoors and outdoors) to support the storyline, including furniture and lighting.
  • Script (Continuity) Supervisor –Documents the physical aspects of every take of every scene; ensures the actors deliver correct lines; and keeps track of any ad-hoc script changes.
  • Reset and Hold – Cameras are still rolling when the director gives these commands. Reset means go back to an earlier point and repeat; hold means to wait for further direction.

For more information on Principal Photography, please see Additional Information.

Check out photos from these two days on set.

Please provide your thoughts and questions in the comments. I would really enjoy hearing from you. If you have a topic in mind you would like me to cover, please let me know.

Additional Information

Elements of Cinema

Wikipedia:  Principal Photography

Cathrine Kellison, Dustin Morrow, Kacey Morrow, Producing for TV and New Media, 3rd Edition, 2013, Focal Press

Alan Greenstein (Production Assistant) (photo from Sharrie Mccain)
Brandon Hoover (Production Assistant), Sharrie Mccain (Director), Tony Barber (Production Assistant) (photo from author’s collection)
Zhadyn (photo from author’s collection)
Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography) (photo from author’s collection)
AL Washington (1st Assistant Director/Script Supervisor), Rick Palmer, Zhadyn, Brandon Hoover (Production Assistant), Tony Barber (Production Assistant) (photo from author’s collection)
Kenneth Dickerson, Sharrie Mccain (Director), Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography), Rick Palmer, Zhadyn (photo from author’s collection)
Bryan Gay (Sound engineer), Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography), AL Washington (1st Assistant Director/Script Supervisor), Alan Greenstein (Production Assistant) (photo from Sharrie Mccain)
Eric Brooks, BJ Soden (photo from author’s collection)
Slate (photo from author’s collection)
Fooling around: Sharrie Mccain (Director), Eric Brooks (photo from author’s collection)
Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography), Alan Greenstein (Production Assistant) (photo from Sharrie Mccain)
Sharrie Mccain (Director), Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography), AL Washington (1st Assistant Director/Script Supervisor) (photo from author’s collection)
Kenneth Dickerson (inside car) (photo from author’s collection)
Patrick Burnett, Kenneth Dickerson (photo from author’s collection)
Patrick Burnett, Morgen Whiteman (Director of Photography) (photo from author’s collection)
Brandon Hoover (Production Assistant), Layla, Alaja Greene
Antoinette Greene-Fisher (photo from author’s collection)
Antoinette Greene-Fisher, Alaja Greene, Layla (photo from author’s collection)
Antoinette Greene-Fisher, Sharrie Mccain (Director), AL Washington (1st Assistant Director/Script Supervisor) (photo from author’s collection)
Sharrie Mccain (Director), Layla, Alan Greenstein (Production Assistant) (photo from Sharrie Mccain)
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2 thoughts on “Support our #filmmakers: My Weekend on Set of Sharrie Mccain’s “Collision Envisage”: What I have Learned

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